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Thread: Geo-food

  1. #1
    keehotee Guest

    Red face Geo-food

    As this seems to have died a death I thought I'd kick it off again.

    So - things to eat while caching - or things to eat that you collect while caching.......


    Hedgehog spaghetti carbonara (serves four) opcorn:
    500g spaghetti, 30ml olive oil, 250g lean hedgehog, 1 medium onion (chopped), 125ml water, 60ml dry white wine, 4 eggs, 60ml double cream, 100g grated parmesan cheese chop hedgehog into small chunks
    beat eggs and cream together in a bowl. Add half the parmesan cheese
    put pasta in boiling water
    put onions and hedgehog chunks in pan with olive oil on medium heat until onions are almost clear
    add wine and reduce heat
    drain pasta when cooked, combine it with egg, cream and cheese mix
    add meat, onions and wine without draining fat and mix thoroughly garnish with remaining parmesan. Serve immediately

    From this article - http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2006/ja...ritishidentity
    Last edited by keehotee; 28th May 2008 at 12:38 PM.

  2. #2
    nobbynobbs Guest

    Default

    Wild garlic is always very nice, bit past now but a spring freebie to smell out for!

    But let's not forget the autumn favourite. Sloes a nice batch of sloe gin to get you through the darkest months.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Cambridge
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    Come August/September - the blackberries are always welcome on a long caching walk.
    Happy Caching

    Gazooks

    - Setting a good example for children takes all the fun out of middle age.

  4. #4

    Join Date
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    After the blackberries it's hazel nuts for me if squirrels don't live nearby and sweet chestnuts where the squirrels do live .

    I ate a few juicy new hawthorn leaves in the spring ,used to call it bread and cheese wnen I was a young country child .
    We like Greens

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Last year, picked loads of Damsons, Bullases, Blackberries raspberries and Bilberries.

    Always nice to fill the larder with jam and pie fillings.

    All at cache sites as well.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Elderberries, for the wine, which if well made is a deep red, strong, and delicious one, and earlier in the year elderflowers, for, well, the wine, lol... :cheers:
    ​​Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light. (Dylan Thomas)​


  7. #7

    Join Date
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    Don't know if it's of interest to anyone but in the summer edition of the National Trust magazine they have announced a special offer on a new NT Books publication entitled Wild Food by Jane Eastoe ISBN 9781905400591 rrp £6-99
    The book tells you how to find and cook wild produce from berries, herbs and nuts to seaweed, flowers and roots as well as containing many traditional recipes such as sloe gin, horseradish sauce and nettle soup.
    The offer price is £4-99 plus free p&p. Call 0870 787 1613 and quote CH862. Offer ends 30th September 08. (We don't know what the call rate is for 0870 numbers - it might be worth checking before you order if you're interested)

    Before you ask the answer is NO. Other than being National Trust members we have no financial interests in the organisation whatsoever.

  8. #8

    Join Date
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    Izzy and the Lizard King wrote:
    We don't know what the call rate is for 0870 numbers
    From BT landlines the daytime charge is a 6p connection fee and then 6p per minute. Cable operators are usually more expensive - e.g. Virgin has a 7p connection fee and then 10p per minute.

    I'm with Virgin... :wacko:
    ​​Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light. (Dylan Thomas)​


  9. #9
    fraggle69 Guest

    Default

    shroooms man - what else would you possibly want to eat?

    munch munch

  10. #10

    Join Date
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    Land of the Bear and Ragged Staff!
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    Traditional way to eat hedgehog is baked in clay.

    Wrap hedgehog in clay, place in fire (or oven) and bake.
    Smash off the clay, and he spikes come off as well.
    I have a Geocaching problem...
    Work gets in the way!

    * Cache Walker -Caching by byway, not highway! CacheWalker.co.uk
    Walking and Caching in Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Gloucestershire areas

  11. #11

    Join Date
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    Pigeon and other small game birds can be done in the same way. Feathers and skin come off together and the meat stays moist not being allowed to dry out. Added benefit there were not masses of feathers to try and hide/dispose of or give the game away.
    Last edited by Ten point nine; 15th June 2008 at 12:57 AM. Reason: Spilling errer

  12. #12

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    Ten point nine wrote:
    ...or give the game away.
    I love the pun, intended or not...!
    ​​Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light. (Dylan Thomas)​


  13. #13

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Norfolk
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    Default Pigeon Pie

    My own recipe for Pigeon pie

    1 onion chopped
    6 pigeon breast's sliced
    2tbsp flour
    1/4pt chick stock
    1/4pt red wine + a glass for the cook
    sliced mushrooms
    seasoning

    8oz shortcrust pastry

    Fry the onion until soft then add pigeon and fry until browned
    Add flour and cook for a couple of mins,
    Add stock, wine and mushrooms and leave to simmer until fluid has reduced and is the consistency of thick gravy

    Line a pie dish with half the pastry, add pigeon filling pop on a pastry lid and bake for 45 min 180C

    The timings are approx and so are the measurements cos I rarely measure anything just bung it in till it looks right

    Best enjoyed with homegrown cooked veg and more loely red wine

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