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Thread: Favourite cache types and containers

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Default Favourite cache types and containers

    I know this is a hoary old chestnut that crops up again and again, but as we've had a lot of new users signing up in recent months I thought it might be worth airing again.

    What is your favourite cache type?

    Traditional
    Multi
    Puzzle/Mystery
    Earthcache
    Event
    Webcam
    Virtual (still available on some sites)
    Locationless (ditto)
    Or anything else I've missed.

    I thought about doing this as a poll, but I'm more interested in hearing opinions than counting numbers.

    And what sort of container do you prefer?

    Feel free to tell us your pet hates too!
    ​​Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light. (Dylan Thomas)​


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Talking

    To a certain extent, almost every cache find pits the wits of the cache setter against the cache seeker, so the element of "hunting" is present and that's where the main pleasure lies for me. Those caches where the hunt is absent or minimal have to be in lovely locations to justify their existence.

    The complexity of the hunt can be increased in the field with multi-caches (including offset caches), puzzles that you have to solve in the field and these particularly appeal to me and would be my favourites.

    To this end, it is possible to make virtual caches interesting and demanding and I believe these have their place, particularly in cities.

    After that, I like the puzzles you have to solve indoors first, even if it is simply a matter of finding answers to some questions about the place where the cache lies, or the cache topic. Such questions can enhance the visit. I also like ingenious puzzles where you have to tune in to the thinking of the cache setter. I'm less of a fan of the horrendously difficult puzzles because they are inaccessible to many cachers, or themed methodical caches like suduko puzzles.

    As for cache containers, there's something very satifying about ammo boxes, probably because I associate them with caching and they are not every-day objects. I also like disguised containers that look as though they are part of the environment as that enhances the hunt.

    Regards, Roderick

  3. #3
    keehotee Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D (wwh) View Post
    What is your favourite cache type?
    Traditional - as long as it's not yet another micro in a hedge
    Multi - if it's a nice walk, and not just an offset.
    Puzzle/Mystery - if they're interesting and fit the plot. Not a fan of "puzzles for the sake of puzzles" (even if I have published some myself)
    Earthcache - if it's somewhere I'd be interested in. Not if it's just used as a way of getting a virtual published.
    Event - love 'em.... beer helps
    Webcam - take them or leave them.
    Virtual (still available on some sites) - see earthcache above.
    Locationless - pointless.

    I hate - HATE - nanos when they're used instead of a creative hide. Unfortunately there seems to be a growth of nanos around here where nanos didn't oughta be. Save them for busy town centres people - cycle track miles from anywhere does NOT need another doggy address holder hung on a fence!!!

  4. #4
    nobbynobbs Guest

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    It's the location for me every time. I've been on great multis that have taken me for walks around areas that I didn't know, likewise traditionals to new places that were worth the trip. With a reasonable size container not a $$$$$ nano in the middle of the countryside. or anywhere for that matter. Caches in the centre of towns that are either so public that you can't get them without being muggled or in places where the average dog relieves themselves... really, why????
    But there are some well thought out great walks through towns that take you to the hidden spots and then end up with a reasonable container in a safe spot.

    Puzzles. Cant do them, irritate me to $$$$$$$ I don't know if I'm just dim but I draw a blank so they're off limits to me unless I get help from a friendly source.

    Events. excellent should be more

    Earth caches. as long as they are well thought out and at a suitable spot, excellent.

    Nanos and 35 mm pots thrown into hedges every 300m. please just dont.

    :cheers:

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Default

    Micros and Nanos that are inapproriatly placed {use a small box if you can} but that said they do have their places in Urban areas of interest.
    Puzzles?? I agree 100% with NobbyNobbs they really bug me, I reckon it is because my brain works to logically, well thats my excuse and I'm sticking to it.
    Multis: As long as they take me on an nice walk and preferably a circular one. (hate going for a long walk and then having to back track to get to the car)
    Virtuals: Wish we could still set them.
    Webcams: Can't be bothered.
    Events: These I like as it gives us a chance to put faces to names in logbooks. We try to attend them when we are travelling around on our long extended holidays (normally 7months at a time) Maybe we will be in your area soon.

  6. #6

    Join Date
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    Default

    I generally agree with these opinions being expressed regarding micros and nanos being placed where there's opportunity to put a proper box but while at the Dublin event last weekend I was speaking to a cacher there who mostly puts out micros (film cans) in his local countryside.

    He defended his choice by saying (I'll paraphrase here) that, for him, it was all about showing other geocachers the location or great view. He just wanted cachers to go to the spot and enjoy the area and he used the cache page to give them the necessary information to enhance the experience.

    For him, the whole thing about having a box for swaps or trackables was not that important in his scheme of things.

    Each to their own etc...

  7. #7

    Join Date
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    Default

    I agree with most comments so far. For me caches need to take me to places I would not necessarily have gone without a cache being there.
    I like the walk as well as the hunt and a bit of history or interest makes it better. Dislike caches stuck on footpaths just because the footpath is there - no view, no interest - no fun.
    I agree about a suitable sized container for the environemnt - far too many micros in hedges or woods. I just hate having to search and ivy covered tree in the middle of a wood when there is several other locations nearby that would support a small container.
    One excuse I heard was that micros are easier and cheaper to maintain and less likely to be muggled.

    My main bug bears are naff clues (in root of tree in the middle of a wood) and lack of suggested parking. Its all very well if you live in the area and might know where to park but when you start travelling 50+ miles away from home to an unknown area - parking info is useful - or is that just me.

    Trads are .... trads - OK get the job done.
    Multis - as others have said - nice walk and circular if possible.
    Puzzle/Mystery - Don't mind puzzles as long as they are solvable - hate 'A' level type maths calculations to get a set of co-ords.
    Earthcache - Ok as long as they are educational or serve a purpose
    Event - nice to put faces to names
    Webcam - OK when they are working
    Virtual (still available on some sites) - OK - when a normal cache is inappropriate
    Locationless (ditto) - gave me a few quickies when I first started but no real effort involved - in the main.
    Happy Caching

    Gazooks

    - Setting a good example for children takes all the fun out of middle age.

  8. #8

    Default

    Nowadays I prefer trails, e.g. 10 or so small caches giving the co-ords to a bonus cach. The reason I prefer these over a regular multi is that you know where you're going to be taken from the outset and can properly plan for the lenght and difficulty, whereas with many regular multi's you have no idea how long the walk is going to be or whether it will leave you stranded miles from the start or bring you back to the car.

    As for containers, I hardly ever do swaps (except bugs & coins) so it shouldn't matter to me, but I do sometimes get annoyed when searching for micros/nanos in the woods, although having said that I prefer trails where there are a mix of sizes (including micros), so you're never quite sure what the hider has used, which makes the hunting more interesting. I agree with Sandvika when he said that there's something satisfying about an ammo box though, and always prefer to find one over tupperware.


    I don't mind puzzles where there's at least some clue as to where to start, but a puzzle that's just a page full of letters and you're expected to figure out what cipher is being used hacks me off.

    I used to like locationless caches, and spent quite some in the old days time hunting for features around home that would fit a locationless cache so I could log it. Since these jumped the fence to waymarking I can't be bothered with them though.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martybartfast View Post
    I used to like locationless caches, and spent quite some in the old days time hunting for features around home that would fit a locationless cache so I could log it. Since these jumped the fence to waymarking I can't be bothered with them though.
    I tried Waymarking and found it is not really a scavenger hunt but a form of virtual cache. The value of the waymark comes from the amount of detail added in the listing and the scenic nature of the actual location. I found it to be a ghost site and did not provide enough satisfaction for the effort involved.

    Locationless caching is available as a separate game on Terracaching (your score is separate from that of your traditional caching) and I enjoy it there, within reason. There are some pretty lame locationless caches and I either ignore them, or do them and vote them down. I have created a couple that are reasonably demanding and thus have accumulated quite high scores, which increases the incentive for others to find them.

    I think if you enjoyed the locationless caches on GC before they were scrapped, you'd probably enjoy the locationless game on TC too. Similarly, if you enjoy trigpointing, which is essentially a scavenger hunt too, then locationless caches may have a similar appeal.

    That said, for every person who likes locationless caches, there is one who doesn't (rather as with Marmite) so... whatever floats your boat!

  10. #10

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    Default

    Don't like ammo cans because I haven't the strength to open them and have to ask me ol' man to do it. :lol:.
    We like Greens

  11. #11

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    Default

    I like a mixture of caches really. Puzzles appeal when they look "different", i.e. not just another SuDoku or something. When I've solved a good puzzle I can't wait to log the cache. I do like ammo boxes as containers, although anything clean and waterproof is acceptable. It's easier to say what I don't go for; this includes multicaches that are over-long or involve contrived arithmetic, and indifferent-looking traditionals that are presented in a careless fashion (multiple typos, bad grammar and so on).

    I quite like waymarks for a change; I can hardly drive past a post box now without checking for the magic "VR" letters, and I always photograph trig points. I've only set one waymarking "virtual" (as opposed to the "locationless" type) in the last couple of years, but I'm constantly looking out for another suitable venue. The waymarking community seems a bit different from geocachers as well, reminding me more of geograph contributors (geographs: another geocaching alternative). Waymarking is incredibly popular in the UK nowadays, after a slow start.

  12. #12

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    Default

    I've just realized that though I started this thread I haven't given my own opinions, doh...!

    At the moment I'm hardly doing any caching - due to illness I can't walk any real distance without getting extremely breathless, but in normal times I prefer traditionals. I like to know where I'm going so that I'm able to plan routes and estimate times.

    Like some others who've posted, I don't like multis that take me on a long walk out to the final container and then I've got to slog it back again - I prefer more-or-less circular routes that end somewhere near the parking area.

    I like virtuals too - for me it's about the location, not about the box. Unfortunately there aren't many left now.

    Unlike a lot of people I don't like ammo cans - I far prefer lok n lok boxes. Ammo cans are sometimes quite noisy to open, which can be problematic in muggle-heavy spots. And they can also, especially if they haven't been visited for some time, be difficult to open. They're also clumsy and conspicuous when open, and far harder to conceal if muggles happen by than lunch boxes are.

    I don't mind micros in appropriate locations, but I hate urban micros - feeling behind down pipes in city centres under the eyes of passers by just isn't my thing, I'm afraid.
    ​​Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light. (Dylan Thomas)​


  13. #13
    blaidd-drwg Guest

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    For the few caches I've found in the UK, I've enjoyed most. Micros are always my least favorite, as they're often spinkled around. I really enjoy many of the virtuals that take you to interesting spots with a bit of history. The few regular caches that I've found that weren't micros were tupperware containers. It was nice to trade items and see what passes for swag in different areas. Here in the states my favorite cache is a good old ammo can hidden somewhere in the woods. Short walks through the woods of about 1/4 to 1/2 mile are about right. I believe my favorite cache in the UK was an event held in London at the Ye Olde Mitre. It was a great evening getting to meet local UK cachers and enjoy some good ale.

  14. #14
    molfrew-mosstoad Guest

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    Best caches for me have got to be a well thought out multi, circular if possible over a 4-5 mile walk with interesting views.

    Puzzles, cant do them biggest hate! lol
    Trads are ok we tend to do thses with the kids as its a staright to & from walk so you have a rough idea of how far & how long its gonna take.
    Events are cool to put faces to names & they usually involve Ale :cheers:
    Earthcache- oh yes if its got a bit of history to it and somthing to see.
    Viturals depends on whats there,done some great ones... & some not.

    As others have already said I do prefer the cache size to reflect the area, no micros in the woods please. Im not a big fan of urban caches, although have done some nice urban multis where the final is hidden away from prying eyes much better than having the feeling of being watched and feeling more suspicious.

    I must agree with Gazooks its nice to have a suggested parking area as I have been put off some caches for not finding a suitable parking place.

  15. #15

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    Location and size are everything for me - the type of cache isn't so important. I really can't stand it when someone hides a film pot in a hedge - people should get more creative!
    I always used to prefer traditionals, but now only if they are worthwhile and take me somewhere interesting (a lay-by is not interesting).
    Recently I've started to enjoy puzzle, multis and wherigo caches much more than I ever used to. I think that generally cache setters put more effort into them and so you are more likely to be rewarded with a decent walk/hide/container.

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